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New 4Degra bioresorbable materials support micro 3D printing

Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF), one of the pioneers in microscale 3D printing systems, and UK-based 3D printing materials company 4D Biomaterials have jointly achieved the capability to print micro-scale geometries using 4Degra bioresorbable materials. This marks the first time a bioresorbable material has been printed using micro 3D printing and the two companies expect it will revolutionize the way implantable medical devices are manufactured in the future.

Aimed at creating biocompatible and bioresorbable micro-scale medical devices, the joint innovation has a variety of applications and opportunities for medical device manufacturers and innovators, ranging from micro-scale rigid orthopedic devices and fixations through to micro-scale soft tissue applications.

BMF and 4D Biomaterials Make Micro-Scale Geometries with Bioresorbable Materials

One area in which micro 3D printing has been steadily gaining interest is in the medical sector. Thanks to the ability to create smaller and smaller parts, 3D printing enables customized medical devices for patients. Now, Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF) and 4D Biomaterials have made yet another step forward in the sector. Recently, the two companies announced that for the first time they have the capabilities to print micro-scale geometries using 4Degra® bioresorbable materials.

Bioresorbable materials are defined as materials that are able to degrade safely within the body after performing their function. As might be obvious, they are important in medicine, especially in terms of implants, as they can help to facilitate healing before naturally breaking down and being absorbed by the body, helping to avoid surgery to remove the medical devices. Though many companies have made great strides with 3D printing medical devices, both BMF and 4D Biomaterials claim that this is the first time that bioresorbable materials have been printed using micro additive manufacturing.

BMF and 4D Biomaterials Partner to Bring Bioresorbable Materials to Micro 3D Printing

BOSTON and NOTTINGHAM, United Kingdom, Dec. 7, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF), the pioneer in microscale 3D printing systems, and UK-based 3D printing materials company 4D Biomaterials today announce the capability to print micro-scale geometries using 4Degra® bioresorbable materials. This achievement marks the first time a bioresorbable material has been printed using micro 3D printing and will revolutionize the way implantable medical devices are manufactured in the future.

Aimed at creating biocompatible and bioresorbable micro-scale medical devices, the joint innovation has a variety of applications and opportunities for medical device manufacturers and innovators, ranging from micro-scale rigid orthopedic devices and fixations through to micro-scale soft tissue applications.

The partnership combines BMF's innovative projection micro-stereolithography (PµSL) approach with 4D Biomaterials' 4Degra resin inks which together will help to solve design and biocompatibility issues for medical device manufacturers, opening up new opportunities for implantable devices and improving patient care.

BMF and 4D Biomaterials announce new capability to develop medical devices

Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF), a microscale 3D printing systems specialist and UK-based 3D printing materials company, 4D Biomaterials has announced the capability to print micro-scale geometries using 4Degra bioresorbable materials.

This achievement marks the first time a bioresorbable material has been printed using micro 3D printing and aims to revolutionise the way implantable medical devices are manufactured in the future.

Aimed at creating biocompatible and bioresorbable micro-scale medical devices, the joint innovation has a variety of applications and opportunities for medical device manufacturers and innovators, ranging from micro-scale rigid orthopaedic devices and fixations through to micro-scale soft tissue applications.

3D Printing Mingles with Micro

Propelled by materials advances, innovative techniques and performance improvements, additive manufacturing (AM) has come a long way since the days of experimentation for prototyping or consumer hobbyist applications.

As AM gains traction for full-scale production use cases, the technology is evolving to conquer another new frontier: The production of micro-scale parts that were previously out of reach with conventional 3D printing technologies.

Demand for micro-scale parts is booming as products gain complexity and decrease in size to accommodate a smaller footprint. In the heath care sector, for example, there is evidence of more miniaturized drug delivery devices, wearables on a chip and hearing aids. At the same time, the myriad chips, arrays and sensors that power electronics devices, defense equipment and new generation of semi- and fully-autonomous vehicles are also rapidly contracting as they gain sophistication and empower innovative use cases.

BMF and 4D Biomaterials Partner to Bring Bioresorbable Materials to Micro 3D Printing

Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF), the pioneer in microscale 3D printing systems and UK-based 3D printing materials company, 4D Biomaterials today announce the capability to print micro-scale geometries using 4Degra® bioresorbable materials. This achievement marks the first time a bioresorbable material has been printed using micro 3D printing and will revolutionize the way implantable medical devices are manufactured in the future.

BMF strengthens its team with Ferenc Toth

Boston Micro Fabrication (BMF), a pioneer in 3D printing systems for micro fabrication, is adding Ferenc Toth, an experienced 3D printing sales expert, for further expansion in Europe, particularly in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The new Sales Manager DACH/Europe will be available as a contact person at the Formnext trade fair in Frankfurt from Nov. 16 to 19, 2021.

3D Printing For More Circuits

After several years of experimentation, and growing success in volume manufacturing for some use cases, technologies for 3D printing of electronic circuits are becoming more common. Some innovations in processes and materials are moving these technologies closer to mainstream electronics manufacturing.

Christopher Tuck, professor of material science at the University of Nottingham, observed that what’s particularly attractive among the many different processes and materials used for additive manufacturing (AM) is the ability to build up one layer at a time, which increases design flexibility. That results in improvements in performance and heat management, plus the ability to optimize component architectures.

Micro 3D Printing – The Ultimate Guide

The surging demand for miniaturized devices in electronics, biotechnology, automotive, and aerospace is putting increased interest in the development of microscale additive manufacturing technologies. This 3D printing method can produce tiny parts and components in shapes not possible with traditional manufacturing, faster and at much lower costs. Manufacturers 3D printing their own micro parts in-house are not effected by today’s supply chain disruptions.